Dancing Maths Activities @ 07 Nov 2016
Here are a few simple ideas to get your class dancing about maths...

1. Number of body parts
Warm up: Ask the children to demonstrate a different numbers of body parts touching the floor, for example they could: balance on one foot and two hands – this equals three body parts touching the floor; balance on one knee, one foot, two elbows and their forehead – this equals five body parts touching the floor.

Activity: Play a piece of music and ask the children to walk around the space in any direction (making sure they are aware of others in the room). Explain to the children that when the music stops, you will call out a number and they must put this number of body parts on the floor. The children should balance in this shape while you go around to check they have the correct number of body parts touching the floor. During the activity, congratulate them for creating such interesting shapes. Repeat the activity, calling out a different number (of body parts) each time.

Extension 1: Instead of just walking to the music, ask the children to perform different actions, for example hopping, skipping, turning, rolling, jumping, and so on. Alternatively, you could ask them to move around like a robot, like jelly, like a frog, and so on.

Extension 2: Ask the children to work with a partner. When you ask them to balance on a number of body parts, it needs to be between them. For example, if you call out Five body parts, child one could balance on one foot and two hands, and child two could balance on one foot and one hand, so they are balancing on five body parts altogether.

2. Body digits
Ask the children to try and create the shape of numbers with their bodies. They could try to make their age or their house number, or you could ask them to solve simple sums and provide the answer by shaping their bodies.

3. Guess my number
This activity would work well as a cool down and could be done slowly to relaxing music to create a calm mood. Ask the children to sit on the floor with a partner, one in front of the other. Number the children ‘one’ and ‘two’ and tell child one to gently trace a number on the back of child two. Child two should try to guess the number being traced on their back. Tell the children to swap roles afterwards. Did the children guess the numbers correctly?
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